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NEWS: Discovery of a new archaeological necropolis in Luxor

The Minister of Antiquities (Source: Egypt Today).

“Khaled Al-Anani; Minister of Antiquities and Mohamed Badr, governor of Luxor, announced the discovery of a new archaeological necropolis in Luxor city. 

According to Anani in a press release, a press conference will be held on September 9 to reveal more details about the new discovery. 
In an earlier statement, the head of the Luxor Antiquities Agency, Mustafa Waziri, said that he was confident that the new cemetery, to be announced on the western bank by the Minister of Antiquities, would be greater and more historic than the Userhat cemetery announced in April. 
According to Waziri, the tomb will be a big surprise. It outnumbered the statues discovered inside the Alushabti site last April. This necropolis contains 1,400 statues of different sizes, as well as coffins with mummies and masks belonging to the owner of the cemetery with painted colors preserved for thousands of years” – via Egypt Today.

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NEWS: Three Ptolemaic tombs found in Al-Kamin Al-Sahrawi

“During excavation work carried out at Al-Kamin Al-Sahrawi area, south east of Samalout Town in Al-Menia Governorate,an Egyptian archaeological mission from the Ministry of Antiquities discovered three Ptolemaic tombs.

Dr. Ayman Ashmawy, Head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector at the Ministry explains that inside these tombs, excavators have unearthed a collection of sarcophagi of different shapes and sizes as well as clay fragments that date the tombs between the 27th Dynasty and the Greaco-Roman era. 

“A fact suggests that the area was a great cemetery along a long span of time,” asserted Dr. Ashmawy who describes the discovery as “very important” because it reveals more secrets of Al-Kamil Al-Sahrawi archaeological site,”He added that along the previous excavation work the mission succeeded to uncover about 20 tombs designed in Catacombs architecture, which was wide spread during the 27th dynasty and the Greaco-Roman time.

Ali Al- Bakry Head of the mission explains that the three newly discovered tombs have a different architecture design than the previously discovered ones. The first tomb is composed of a perpendicular burial shaft engraved in the rock and leads to a burial chamber containing four sarcophagi with anthropoid lids. Nine burial holes were also uncovered.

The second tomb consists of a perpendicular burial shaft and two burial chambers. the first chamber is located to the north, where remains of two sarcophagi are found suggesting that it was the burial of two people. A collection of 6 holes for burial were also found among them one was the burial of a small child.

“This was the first time to find a burial of a child in kamin Al-Sahrawi site,” Al-Bakry said adding that the second room is located at the end of the shaft and does not contain anything except of remains of a wooden coffin.

Excavation Works at the third tomb has not finished yet.

Al-Bakry pointed out that studies carried out on bones found show that the bones are for men, women and children of different ages, a fact affirms that these tombs was part of a large cemetery for a large city and not a military garrisons as some suggest.

The first excavation mission started in 2015 when the mission unearthed a collection of five sarcophagi of different shapes and sizes as well as remains of a wooden sarcophagus. The second session starts in October 2016 where five tombs were uncovered.

Four of them have similar interior design while the fifth consists of a burial shaft.

Works are under way in order to reveal more secrets.” – MOA press release 15/8/2017 (via The EEF).

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NEWS: King Tut’s Wife May Be Buried in Newly Discovered Tomb

This shot of the Valley of the Kings shows the tomb entrances at Thebes in Egypt (Source: Live Science).

“Famed archaeologist Zahi Hawass and his team say they’ve found evidence of a tomb that could belong to King Tut’s wife.  

The archaeologists eventually plan to excavate the new tomb, which is located near the tomb of the pharaoh Ay (1327-1323 B.C.) in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, Hawass told Live Science.
“We are sure there is a tomb there, but we do not know for sure to whom it belongs,” Hawass told Live Science in an email. On July 7, National Geographic Italia published an article in Italian suggesting that a team led by Hawass had found a new tomb in the Valley of the Kings, and Hawass confirmed that discovery to Live Science. [See Photos of Egypt’s Valley of the Kings]

“We are sure there is a tomb hidden in that area because I found four foundation deposits,” Hawass said, explaining that the foundations are “caches or holes in the ground that were filled with votive objects such as pottery vessels, food remains and other tools as a sign that a tomb construction is being initiated.”
“The ancient Egyptians usually did four or five foundation deposits whenever they started a tomb’s construction,” Hawass said. Additionally, “the radar did detect a substructure that could be the entrance of a tomb.”

As for whose remains were buried there, Hawass said the tomb could belong to Ankhesenamun, who was the wife of Tutankhamun (reign 1336-1327 B.C.). Ankhesenamun married Ay after King Tut died, so it’s possible that her tomb is located near Ay’s, Hawass said.

Hawass said he will direct the future excavations at the site.
Hawass was head of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities between 2002 and 2011, and was Egypt’s first minister of state for antiquities after the post was created in January 2011. He resigned from the post in July 2011. Currently, Hawass is Director of the Italian expedition in the Valley of the Kings.
Update: In an email to Live Science on July 10, Hawass cautioned that until excavations take place, he can’t say for sure that a tomb has been discovered, and it is still possible that there is no tomb. “It is all possibilities until we excavate,” Hawass said.” – via Live Science.

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NEWS: Cachette of 17 mummies unearthed in Egypt’s El-Minya

Egyptian Antiquities Minister Khaled el-Enany (C) speaks to the media on May 13, 2017, in front of mummies following their discovery in catacombs in the Touna el-Gabal district of the Minya province, in central Egypt (Source: Ahram Online).

“Tuna Al-Gabal archaeological site, near Upper Egypt’s El-Minya, buzzed Saturday with journalists who flocked in to catch a glimpse of a newly discovered cachette of mummies, dating from the Late Period.

During excavation work in the area, which neighbours the birds and animals necropolis, a mission from Cairo University stumbled this week upon the cachette — a term that describes an unmarked burial site used to house multiple mummies and protect them from looting.
Mission head Salah El-Kholi told Ahram Online that the cachette includes 17 non-royal mummies wrapped in linen and very well preserved. It was found by chance through a radar survey carried out in collaboration with experts from the university’s faculty of science in early 2016 that revealed hollow ground.
El-Kholi said the mummies were found in burial shafts along with a collection of eight limestone sarcophagi, two of which were carved in clay. A number of baboon coffins were also found.

Minister of Antiquities Khaled El-Enany described the discovery as important because it is the first made in the area since the discovery of the birds and animals necropolis by Egyptologist Sami Gabra between 1931 to 1954.
The discovery adds to a spate of recent finds at sites across Egypt. Most recently, a mission from the antiquities ministry stumbled upon the almost intact funerary collection of Userhat, the chancellor of Thebes during the 18th dynasty, in the Draa Abul Naga necropolis on Luxor’s west bank.
El-Enany told reporters about this week’s cachette discovery at a gala ceremony attended by El-Minya governor Essam Al Bedewi, the ambassadors of Belgium, Hungary and Serbia and a number of top officials from the ministry and Cairo University.
El-Kholi said that both clay sarcophagi are anthropoid coffins, one of which is in good condition while the other is partly damaged. Two papyri written in Demotic and a gold decoration with the shape of a feather were also found.
“This feather could be decoration on the hair dress of one of the deceased,” El- Kholi said.
He said the papyri would be transferred to the Grand Egyptian Museum for restoration.
At a neighbouring site, the mission has also uncovered a number of Roman funerary houses made of clay. Inside they found a collection of different coins, lamps and other domestic items” – via Ahram Online.

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NEWS: Egyptian mummy’s name revealed after experts carry out project on a coffin lid held at Chiddingstone Castle

The Egyptian coffin lid on display at Chiddingstone Castle (Source: Kent Online).

“Experts have lifted the lid on the secrets of a 3,000-year-old Egyptian coffin, part of which is held at a Kent castle.

Managers at Chiddingstone Castle have completed their quest to find the name of the person whose mummy had been interred inside the coffin, the lid from which is on display in the castle.
Egyptologist and imaging specialist at UCL Advanced Imaging Consultants and Cerys Jones, a PhD candidate in imaging applied to heritage, carried out a multispectral imaging of the coffin lid and an infrared filter was able to spell out the name on the lid, written in the pigment Egytian blue, which fluoresces in the infrared when the light is applied.
After consulting with other experts in the USA and Egypt, Dr Piquette announced that they were “relatively certain” that the person interred was called Irethoreru. Translated, the name is “The eye of Horus is against them”, a fairly common male name used between 664 BC and 30 AD.

With the help of different imaging and processing methods, the team were also able to find two figures of what appeared to be seated goddesses on either side of the central inscription.
Castle curator Maria Esain said: “Our Ancient Egyptian coffin lid that has been exhibited here for many years has undergone some careful conservation and advanced digital imaging. There is a saying from ancient Egyptian times – “To speak a man’s name is to restore him to eternal life.” Therefore, if we were able to determine the name written in hieroglyphs on the ‘foot’ of the coffin then we would be enabling that person to live forever.”
The coffin lid is now back on display in its improved display case with additional LED lighting to make the inscription more visible.
It comes a few months after experts used a CT scan to find out the age of Ta-Kush, the 2,700-year-old Egyptian mummy at Maidstone Museum.
The castle’s ancient Egyptian collection is among a number of artefacts on show at the castle, including a Japanese collection, Buddhist artefacts and a Stuart collection.

Chiddingstone Castle is open Sundays to Wednesdays and Bank Holiday Monday. For details go to chiddingstonecastle.org.uk” – via Kent Online.

 

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NEWS: Studies on newly discovered pyramid point to 13th Dynasty King Kamaw

(Source: Ahram Online).

“Preliminary studies on hieroglyphs found in newly discovered pyramid ruins in the Dahshour necropolis have revealed a cartouche of the 13th Dynasty King Emny Kamaw, Adel Okasha, director-general of the Dahshour necropolis, told Ahram Online.

Okasha said that offering texts are engraved on the ruins, as well as a female name of the king’s family.

Okasha said that excavation work is ongoing to reveal more of the pyramid’s secrets.
Earlier this week, an Egyptian mission from the Ministry of Antiquities uncovered remains of the pyramid.
Okasha says that the structure is composed of a corridor leading to the inside of the pyramid, a hall leading to a southern ramp, and a room at the western end.
An alabaster block measuring 15cm by 17cm has been found in the corridor, engraved with 10 vertical hieroglyphic lines that are still being studied.
A granite lintel and a collection of stony blocks showing the interior design of the pyramid have also been uncovered” – via Ahram Online.

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NEWS: Remains of 13th Dynasty pyramid discovered in Dahshur necropolis

Archaeologists have revealed a portion of the pyramid’s internal structure, described as being in very good condition (Source: Ahram Online).

“The remains of a 13th Dynasty pyramid have been discovered by an Egyptian archaeological mission working in an area to the north of King Senefru’s Bent Pyramid in the Dahshur Necropolis.

Mahmoud Afifi, the head of the ancient Egyptian antiquities sector at the antiquities ministry, announced the find, adding that the remains are in a very good condition and further excavation will take place to reveal more of the structure.

Adel Okasha, director general of the Dahshur Necropolis, explained that the portion of the pyramid uncovered so far shows a part of its inner structure.
This structure is composed of a corridor leading to the inside of the pyramid and a hall that leads to a southern ramp, as well as a room at the western end, he said.
An alabaster block measuring 15 cm by 17 cm was also found in the corridor, engraved with 10 vertical hieroglyphic lines that are still being studied.
A granite lintel and a collection of stoney blocks showing the interior design of the pyramid have also been uncovered.
Further studies will be conducted to identifiy the owner of the pyramid and the kingdom two which it belongs” – via Ahram Online.